Strength in Love

Lent Wednesday 4, March 9th, 2016

2 Corinthians 6:1-13, Psalm 28, Acts 16:11-15

Preached by Pastor Anna C. Haugen, Augustana and Birka Lutheran Churches, Underwood, ND

May the words of my mouth, and the meditations of my heart, be acceptable in your sight, my rock and my redeemer.

Grace and peace to you from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.  Amen.

How many of you think you make decisions rationally, based on facts and logic?  Most people think they do, except for a few big types of decisions.  We all want to think that we do the smart thing, the right thing, the decision that any unbiased observer would think was right.  We like to think we use our head to make the decisions—large and small—and as a culture we tend to dismiss and belittle those who are too swayed by emotion—particularly the softer emotions.  Bleeding hearts, sentimental, emotional, emo, these are not seen as good things.

And yet, scientists tell us that even when we think we are at our most rational, our decisions are based mostly on our emotions.  Someone you don’t like comes up and invites you to an event—you don’t like them, your heart is against them, you decide not to go, and then you come up with reasons why you can’t come.  It looks like rain.  You have other plans.  You’re just too tired.  If a friend had given you the same invitation, your heart would have been more open.  You might have decided to go, and your brain would have come up with reasons to justify your heart’s decision.  Sure, it’s cloudy, but it probably won’t rain after all.  And the other plans can be put off.  And you’re not that tired.  In both cases, your heart made the decision, based on how you felt, and then came up with reasons to justify your decision.  And then you believe you made the smart choice, the right choice, the logical choice, when it wasn’t really your heart making the decision.  Our hearts guide our decisions, and this is the case whether our hearts are hard or soft, closed or open.  Which means that if our hearts are going to be leading our lives, they are really important, for us and for our faith and for the world around us.

So what kind of hearts does God want us to have?  Does God want us to have open hearts, closed hearts, soft hearts, hard hearts, loving hearts, angry hearts, fearful hearts?  God created us each to be different and unique, which means that there are a wide variety of hearts.  But there are very few people in the Bible whose hearts are described as “hard” or “closed,” and pretty much all of them are like Pharaoh in the Exodus—the villains who try to work against God.  In our reading from Corinthians, Paul says that his heart is open and asks the people of Corinth to open wide their hearts, as well.  Open hearts is a good thing, the Bible says, and closed hearts are bad.  Why?  Well, I think it’s because if we close our hearts to our fellow human beings, how can we open them for God?  If we close out our neighbor, or even our enemy, we are dangerously likely to close out God, as well.  Remember that God’s heart is always open to us, no matter how many times we cause pain, no matter how many times we stray.

There’s a stereotype of people who are soft-hearted, that they’re weak, that they’re easily manipulated, that they’re stupid, that they just don’t understand reality.  The world is a hard, cruel place, full of evil and hate and pain, and common wisdom is that people who are too kind, too loving, are just denying reality.  But that’s not the kind of open hearts Paul is talking about.  After all, Paul had been around the block many times.  He’d started out with a hard heart himself, persecuting Jesus’ followers, before his conversion on the way to Damascus.  And then, after that, as an apostle he had been imprisoned, beaten, tortured, he had faced conspiracies and con artists, injury and illness, greed and hate and fear and anger.  In his service to the Gospel he had seen all the ugliness the world had to offer … most of it bent on making him hurt.  He was not a bystander to the cruelties of the world.  He had inflicted them when his heart was hard, and he had suffered them when his heart was opened.  Paul had been on both sides.  And he knew that an open heart was better.  A heart like God’s was better.

Paul endured afflictions, hardships, calamities, beatings, imprisonments, riots, labours, sleepless nights, and hunger.  Yes, he knew all the evil in the world, but he also knew that it was better to meet it with an open heart than a closed one.  Better to respond in love, and open a space for the healing of the world, than to respond with a closed heart and compound the pain.  So Paul responded with purity, knowledge, patience, kindness, holiness of spirit, genuine love, truthful speech, and the power of God.  And because he was open, God could work in his heart, and through him, God could touch other hearts, like Lydia’s heart, like the Corinthians’ hearts.  Because his heart was open to God and to all the world, God could work towards the day when pain and evil and hard hearts are gone forever.

Our hearts guide our thoughts, our hearts guide our actions, our hearts can open us up to God and to the world, and our hearts can isolate us.  Our hearts can lead us to heal people, and our hearts can lead us to hurt people.  May God open our hearts, and live in us, that we may know the riches and comfort of God’s love.

Amen.

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